The Airstream may be a symbol of America’s love of the open road and the pleasure of getting away, but what if you’re at your house and you have people visiting from out of town? Wouldn’t that be a perfect time to use your Airstream as a guesthouse? It definitely would.

This often occurs around the holidays. Instead of packing your whole family into your home, think about using your Airstream, as a guesthouse when people come to visit.

There are a lot of differences between a house and an Airstream. If you’re a seasoned Airstream owner, you might have forgotten all the little distinctions. If you have a guest coming to visit your home that has never been in a rig before, you definitely need to hold an orientation when they get there.

Here are a few tips for using your Airstream as a guesthouse at your home.

First Things First, Proper Toilet Operation

If you’re hosting guests at your home and using your Airstream as a guesthouse, make sure to tell them how the toilet flushes. Consider actually taking them to the toilet to show them where everything is, especially if they have young kids.

What seems obvious or easy in conversation may turn out tricky once they’re in the bathroom. Also, actually showing them the bathroom will help you remember anything you might forget if you just mention it off-hand.

Show Them Any Tricky Doors

Airstream doors don’t always work like house doors. It seems silly, but it’s worth it to go over door operation so you don’t let your guests struggle with the latch or damage something.

Of course, if your guest is there for an extended stay, you’ll want to share how to open the fridge and in return, how to ensure it’s closed.

Not All Electricity is Created Equal

Using your Airstream as a guesthouse at your own home is great, but you probably don’t have a full 30 or 50 amp hookup for your Airstream in your driveway.

However, most houses do have a 15 or 20 amp that you can plug your rig into with a converter. Of course, this means the rig isn’t getting full power and won’t be able to power everything. Some things will simply not work. Definitely, share that information with your guests.

As an extra precaution, go through all the RV systems with your guests and instruct them on what appliances can be used at what times.

You’ll also want to point out how to reset the circuit breaker inside the Airstream. Chances are it may take them a day or two to get used to the limited supply of power.

Invite Your Guests Inside as Much as You Can

While you might love the small space your Airstream affords you, your guests might take a bit to warm up to it. An Airstream can be a very small space to someone who hasn’t ever spent much time in one.

Depending on your guests, their family size, and the luggage they’ve brought to the rig, your Airstream may get cramped quickly.

Don’t forget about those loved ones out there in the driveway. Invite them inside as much as you can for meals and a place to kick back and relax. You can also go to them. Eat your meals outside, play some games in the yard, and have a campfire.

Make Life Easy for Your Guests

Getting used to the rig might be more difficult for some guests. Keep a flashlight by the door just in case they want to leave during the night. While you’re at it, add a spare set of keys to your home. This lets your company know they can come to your house if they need to. You could go the extra mile and light their path to the house for them.

Also, make sure to keep a list of everything you’ve gone over for them on the fridge in the Airstream. That way if they forget something during their stay, they can look at the list. This would include the aforementioned toilet procedures, electric quirks, and so on.

Make Your Rig Feel like Home

An Airstream is meant to be a home on wheels. If your rig hasn’t been used in a while, make it feel like home before your guests arrive.

Put some comfortable pillows on the beds and couch, freshen up the linens, do a thorough cleaning, and make sure the Airstream has everything they need. Make sure to keep the following items in the Airstream:

  • Silverware
  • Dishes
  • Pots and pans
  • Toilet paper
  • Laundry basket
  • Food in the pantry and fridge
  • Running water
  • Movies, Games, Toys, etc

 

If you’re not sure what your guest may need, ask them before they arrive. The extra care may be just what you need to win them over if they aren’t so excited about that limited electricity. If you do things right and make your guests’ stay in your Airstream a success, they may even decide to get one for themselves.

Don't have an Airstream?

Here are some used Airstreams for sale that are perfect for hosting guest.

Max Exposure Listing
1994
34FT
Excella/Limited
$39,500
North Carolina
Max Exposure Listing
1987
31FT
Excella 500
$49,995
Oregon
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1969
18FT
Other
$31,500
California
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1971
27FT
International
$25,000
California
Max Exposure Listing
1973
29FT
Land Yacht
$97,000
New York
1965
22FT
Safari
$57,500
Idaho
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1968
17FT
Caravel
$38,500
California
Max Exposure Listing
2016
28FT
Land Yacht
$74,900
Arizona
Max Exposure Listing
1963
26FT
Overlander
$42,000
Ohio
Max Exposure Listing
1969
31FT
Sovereign
$92,775
Tennessee
Max Exposure Listing
1973
31FT
Sovereign
$65,000
Tennessee
Max Exposure Listing
1961
28FT
Other
$138,500
Minnesota
Max Exposure Listing
1981
31FT
Excella 500
$67,500
Canada

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